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monochrome

Monochrome Madness: MM 216

Last autumn I was in Seattle, and had the chance to walk around downtown under mostly dry skies.  I found these trees to be dynamic with their color, but it wasn’t until recently that I had time to convert these to b&w.  In the original, the two trees are completely different in color, but by changing the individual color values in the conversion, they appear similar, making it a stronger image.

This is my contribution to Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness, having the theme of Seasons this week.  To see what other photographers have contributed, or instructions to join in, please visit Leanne’s website.

Monochrome Madness: MM 203

Antelope Canyon is one of the most photographed spots in the southwestern US.  As you wander through this tight canyon, you can’t help but eventually look towards the sky which is no longer visible.  Light tries to find its way to the bottom, and as it does, highlights the textures of the smooth, twisted, sculpted walls.

This is my contribution to Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness this week.  Being the first one of the month, there was a theme of From Under.  To see what other photographers have contributed, or instructions to join in, please visit Leanne’s website.

Monochrome Madness: MM4-11

For this week’s Monochrome Madness, the theme is wild.  I have been to several places so remote, not even the governing agencies could answer my inquiries as to trail conditions or water reliability.  And although these remote places are seldom seen by people, images captured there may not necessarily reflect the feelings of isolation.

Bryce Canyon, the location of my photo, has spots that you can hike to that will give you a feeling of being in a wilderness, but most of the trails will have you hiking side-by-side with a bunch of strangers.  Despite that, it is still the wildest looking place I have ever been to.  This is my contribution to Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness this week.  To see what other photographers have contributed, or instructions to join in, visit her website.

Monochrome Madness: MM3-52

As spring storms start to lose their punch, it’s time to start venturing further northward.  One place I love to photograph is Cathedral Gorge State Park.  It’s a blink-and-you-miss-it kind of spot along the Great Basin Highway in eastern Nevada.  Full of texture and contrast, it offers many opportunities for black and white photography, and there are places and times where color photography works too.  Storm clouds added another dimension on this spring day.

This photo is my contribution to Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness this week.  Next week starts the fourth year for this project for Leanne.  To see what other photographers have contributed, or instructions to join in, visit her website.

Monochrome Madness: MM3-51

As spring transitions towards summer, cold fronts still pass through the desert, but they rarely contain significant moisture.  They always bring a little breeze, and sometimes, a lot.  A couple weeks ago we had wind gusts in the 70-80 mph range, and there’s never enough moisture to hold down the sand and dust when those fronts come through.  Usually this is landscape photography hell, but if you happen to be in the right spot, you can turn it into opportunity.

My photo was taken in the desert of southern California during one of these spring fronts, and is my contribution to Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness.  Instructions on how to participate, and the contributions of others can be found on her site.

Monochrome Madness: MM3-40

About a year ago, I finally took some time to stop in the Newberry Mountains of southern Nevada.  I posted some of the images in color, but never in b&w.  The landscape provided great texture, and I like this one in b&w more than the color original.

You can find this photo, along with the work of other photographers in Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness this week.  You will also find instructions in how to join in, if you’d like.

Monochrome Madness: MM3-38

The South Rim of the Grand Canyon can be miserably hot in the early parts of summer, so many people find it surprising how miserably cold it can be in winter.  As with many canyons of the southwest, snow doesn’t stick to the sheer walls, so the layers are accentuated by the snow.  Even in relatively flat light, this adds depth to the scene.  Photos taken when winter storms are in the clearing process are some of the most dramatic I’ve ever seen of the canyon, and the temps are usually tolerable at that point.  Watch out for the days following, when wind chill factors can make it feel like Canada.

This is my contribution to Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness this week.  Instructions on how to participate, and the contributions of others can be found on her website.

Monochrome Madness: MM3-37

Last Saturday I had a chance to head out to our nearby mountains.  It had rained down here in the Las Vegas area the day before, and I thought there would be a good chance for some fresh snow higher up.  Even at an elevation of 8000′ there was only a dusting, yet the light up there made for photographs that didn’t disappoint.  I was heading back down when I came across this location.  I knew this was meant to be b&w, and this is straight out of the camera using the monochrome settings.  This is my last shot from 2016, and a nice way to finish the year.

You can find this photo, along with the work of others on Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness weekly posting. There are instructions on her website on how to participate, if you’d like.

Monochrome Madness: MM3-33

On a recent trip into Seattle, the pilot announced that we would be landing in overcast and light rain conditions.  Either the weather changed very quickly or his updates were not recent.  Low clouds with pockets of sunshine made for all kinds of great light on the Puget Sound and downtown Seattle.

This is my contribution to this week’s Monochrome Madness hosted by Leanne Cole.  The photos from other bloggers and instructions on how to participate can be found on her site.

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