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All Time Favorites

I’ve been crazy busy lately, so I’m trying to get caught up here.  In the final installment of the Daily Post Photo Challenge, they put up the topic of All-Time Favorites.  While I have posted some favorites before, these are mostly new to my blog.  I purchased my first real camera over 40 years ago, and moved into large format 5 years after that.  I have some favorites from way back then, and some that have made the ranks within the last year.  Choosing definitive favorites throughout the collection would be impossible, so here are a few from the top of my lists in various categories.

Living in the desert, flowers are a limited subject for me.  The top photo comes from the North Rainbow Trail along the Arizona-Utah border.  We had just dropped into a canyon whose entire bottom was layers of sandstone, when I spotted several Indian Paintbrush in bloom.  Who needs soil anyway?

One of the difficulties in photographing poppies is that they open up when the sun is stronger, then close by the end of the day.  Secondly, they appear in surroundings that are often not very photogenic.  Then, if those two come together, there’s the third variable of decent light.  I think I hit the trifecta when I photographed these poppies in the late afternoon, below a saguaro cactus studded hillside in the desert east of Phoenix, Arizona.  Just as I was setting up, a thin wave of clouds moved in as though someone were pulling a fine lace curtain over the desert.

Saguaro, cactus, poppies, Arizona, desert, spring flowers, Steve Bruno

Although I’m partial to the desert, my travels have not been limited to the warmer regions.  Anyone who has been to the Rocky Mountains in summer knows that you can almost set your watch by the afternoon thunderstorms.  On this mostly clear day, somewhere south of Telluride, I captured this favorite mountain scene as the sun was getting low.

Telluride, Colorado, Rocky Mountains, forest, mountains, Steve Bruno, landscape photography

While the desert does contain a few, there are better chances of finding waterfalls in the mountains.  I think I always had a special place for this one because it was the first time I was able to get behind the falls without getting a wet lens.  Oh, and the light is pretty good, too!  From Rifle Falls, Colorado.

Rifle Falls, Colorado, waterfall, Rocky Mountains, gottatakemorepix

Another place having thunderstorms with clocklike predictability is southeastern Arizona.  While spending a couple very wet afternoons on Mount Graham, I woke up very early the last morning to capture the sunrise coming up over a fog-filled Safford Valley.  I have seen hundreds of sunrises and sunsets from beautiful locations, but this one still ranks high.

sunrise, sunset, mountains, Arizona, Steve Bruno, landscape photography

Seeing mountains from an aerial perspective can be breathtaking, but often too distant to see great detail.  However, mountains and commercial airplanes in close proximity is a bad thing.  Many routes out of Seattle pass close to Mount Rainier.  I was fortunate on this almost cloud free winter Seattle day (yes that sounds like an oxymoron) to capture one of my favorites from an airplane.

Mount Rainier, Washington, National Park, aerial photography, Steve Bruno

While many tend to think of Arizona as hot and dry, there are a few riparian zone gems to be found.  One of them, West Clear Creek, is a photographer’s paradise, as well as a great place to escape the heat.  This is one of my favorites for reflections, and pretty high on the list for canyon photographs.

West Clear Creek, Mogollon Rim, Arizona, reflection, Steve Bruno

The reason it could not take top honors for canyon favorites is because of the next place.  I have hundreds of Grand Canyon photos from various trips, and have seen many different faces that it puts on, but there’s nothing like being in the bottom and really appreciating its scale.

Grand Canyon, National Park, Arizona, Colorado River, Marble Canyon, Steve Bruno

Water in the desert is special, but certainly not the norm.  The counterpart to creeks and rivers would probably have to be sand dunes.  This is truly impossible to pick a favorite, so here is one I have posted before.  From Death Valley at sunrise, I have never seen arcing ridges like these at other dunes I have visited.

sand dunes, Death Valley, National Park, California, desert, sunrise, landscape photography

Q:  When is a wave not made of water, sound or light?  (No, it’s not one of The Riddlers questions for Batman)

A:  When it’s an illusion made of sand at my feet in Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada.  While hiking in a remote part of the park following a flood, the higher ground had dried while the area that had a deeper pool was still damp.  Abstracts are one of my favorite subjects, and this one definitely tops the list.

Valley Of Fire, wave, sand, abstract, Steve Bruno

I’m always looking for detail shots of nature that just show how delicate and beautiful the world can be.  This photo didn’t have any runner-ups to compete with on my list.  Also from Valley of Fire, I simply call this one “Layers”

Valley Of Fire, State Park, Nevada, sandstone, red rock, gottatakemorepix

Despite all the time I’ve spent photographing nature, with many great days, I have one that I still refer to as best day ever.  I left Las Vegas around 3 in the morning to head to Zion National Park.  I arrived just in time to get a glimpse of sunrise hitting the freshly snow covered mountains.  Once I started photographing, there was something to capture my attention around every corner.  Despite great light in the middle of the day, I had to force myself to go down to Springdale for some lunch before returning to keep clicking all the way until the sun went down.  I don’t think there were more than 20 people in the park all day long, and the rangers said they had never seen that much snow before.  Somehow, with the lack of people, I came across one scene that was up about two miles along a trail that someone had walked in the middle of for no apparent reason.  It was the most surreal image I had seen that day, and I was cringing because someone walked through it.  This was slightly pre-Photoshop, and if I had any idea of the changes that were about to happen, I would have captured that image and waited for technology to catch up.  I have no “outtakes” from that day.  If I had a digital camera, I can only imagine the volume of images I would have taken.  Perhaps it was the time-consumption of each setting with a large format camera that placed me in the right moment as I approached the next location at the perfect time.  One of my early morning shots made a cover of a national magazine, but the truth is they’re all favorites, so here’s one the world hasn’t necessarily seen yet.

Zion, National Park, Utah, winter, landscape photography, Steve Bruno

WPC: Serene

As is probably obvious by now, I have a fascination with the desert.  The plants, features, textures and moods always provide reasons to explore further.  Although I have experienced serenity in the desert, I’m not sure I have images that convey that mood – especially to those who have never truly explored those same places.

I think there are many who would agree that oceans are a great place to find serenity, especially on a remote beach at sunrise.  I find that sunrises, in general, tend to be more peaceful and calming than sunsets.  Perhaps because they signal the start of a new day, often witnessed alone.  Almost everyone I know thinks this is not a good time to be awake yet.  That’s OK.  More serenity for me to enjoy.

clouds, reflection, black sand beach, Hawaii, solitude

trees, mountains, sunrise, colorado

I can find calm settings just about anywhere in nature, but I think forested mountains would have to be second on my list, right after oceans.  Having a lake or a small stream is certainly an added element of calming.

mountains, lake, reflections, wasatch mountains, utah, Steve Bruno

Black Hills, South Dakota, rolling hills, Steve Bruno

I spend a fair amount of time in airplanes.  By allowing myself to get distracted looking out the windows, I find this can become very calming, especially when flying over seemingly infinite cloud cover.

gulf of mexico, clouds, aerial photography, gottatakemorepix

clouds, aerial photography

Also making my list would have to be any moment when witnessing a rainbow.  This one happened to be from an airplane.  Ahhhhhhh!

rainbow, sunset, sacramento, california, aerial photography

 

PHOTOS:

  • Feature photo:  Early morning on a black sand beach in Hawaii
  • 2nd:  Same beach and morning as above
  • 3rd:  Sunrise from Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado
  • 4th:  Small lake in the Wasatch Mountains, Utah
  • 5th:  Infinite rolling hills from the Black Hills, South Dakota
  • 6th:  Minimal cloud cover over the Gulf of Mexico
  • 7th:  Sea of clouds somewhere over Texas
  • 8th:  Rainbow upon approach to Sacramento, California

Monochrome Madness: MM3-50

Mesa Verde National Park is one of the best preserved examples of the Ancestral Puebloan culture that once thrived in the American Southwest.  More commonly referred to as Anasazi, which is a Navajo term meaning “enemy ancestor”, these people created structures which were the largest in North America until Europeans settled here and industrialization began.  This civilization vanished around 700 years ago, and experts have various opinions as to how this happened.  A major climate shift started in the mid 1100’s with multiple periods of drought, and would have severely impacted the food supply.  There is also evidence of warfare which may have occurred with nomadic groups.

My photo is of Cliff Palace, the largest of the ruins at Mesa Verde, and is my contribution to Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness, which had the theme this week of culture.  Instructions on how to participate, and the contributions of others can be found on her website.

WPC: Mirror

This week’s Daily Post Challenge theme is Mirror, and as with many bloggers, I have photos of calm bodies of water. Who can resist pointing the camera towards nature’s reflections?  Those weren’t the only ones I came across, and I realized I have more of these than I initially thought I would.  Here are some of my favorites.

I usually had my camera along with the dogs out for an excursion, and in these shots, I noticed some reflections.

In modern buildings, the glass surfaces almost always offer a mirrored image, and here are a couple favorites from Calgary, Alberta.

With that much volume of water in motion, large rivers seem like an unlikely place to find a mirrored surface. Despite that, early morning on the Colorado River in Marble Canyon in Grand Canyon, Arizona can look like this.

Colorado River reflections in Marble Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park - Steve Bruno - gottatakemorepix

In my backyard (relatively speaking), I have a couple spots I enjoy hiking in Red Rock Canyon, where I came across these mirrored surfaces.

One of my favorite places that I’ve ever hiked, West Clear Creek in Arizona, usually has a breeze moving through the canyon.  Early mornings can be very calm, and pools can be glasslike.

Mountain lakes with reflections appear to have proliferated my files without me being aware of it.  Here are some in that category.

One image that always made me look twice was this one from Coyote Buttes.  There is no water or reflection here, but I felt like the illusion was there.

Coyote Buttes, The Wave - Steve Bruno - gottatakemorepix

I have one photo of an actual mirror. This is the MMT (Multiple Mirror Telescope) at the Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona.  During daylight, this telescope dish is tilted down and pointing northward.  This was around the summer solstice, and at sunset, when the sun was at its furthest point north.  As I walked by, this cool mountain air had a hotspot about 20 degrees warmer from the sun just grazing the edge of this dish array.  I can’t imagine the destruction if this thing were aimed in the slightest degree towards the sun.

MMT at Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Arizona - Steve Bruno - gottatakemorepix

Finally, a little bit about the featured image.  That’s Saguaro Lake, on the outskirts of Phoenix, Arizona.  It’s usually a crowded place, especially in summertime.  This happened to be in winter, after a couple days of rain.  It’s a fairly sizeable body of water, and this reflection has to be a rare moment, and the absence of people, even rarer.  This photo will always have a special place in my memories.  It was the first one I ever had published.

Monochrome Madness: MM3-11

Summer started a little over a week ago, and here in Las Vegas we have had 5 days of 110 degrees F already.  In an average year we have between 7 and 9 days (depending on the source) of 110 or higher.  The record is 29 days, from way back in 1940.  Yesterday was a mere 109, and might be the one day that keeps us out of the record books.

Nevada has some mountains worth visiting that allow people to escape the heat, but if this continues, I’ll be heading off towards further destinations.  The photo above, was taken near Pagosa Springs, Colorado.  I like this one because of the shadows of the trees being cast across the falls, in addition to the shapes and motion of the water.  This is my contribution to Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness this week.

Mid-week Mixings: Seasons Greetings

Wishing everyone a peaceful and happy holiday season!

Wordless Wednesday: Colorado Gold

Colorado Gold

WPC: Halved in many places

When I first saw this challenge’s title and the words, “Let’s split our photos in two”, I thought there was no way I was going to have anything to add to the category.  I distinctly remember my teacher’s words, “Don’t ever place the horizon in the middle of the viewfinder, you’ll end up with boring pictures”.

I found one shot that I like that fit the category, and posted that earlier.  As I was going through my files this week, I came across another, then another, and yet some more.  Seems I wasn’t heeding the advice so well.  I’m sorry teacher, I think this was one rule that can be broken on occasion, because I like these.

I came across a few where rivers were against canyon walls, but the one I like best is this one from Zion National Park, Utah, where the river’s edge cuts the shot in two vertically:

Along the river's edge, Zion Narrows, Zion National Park, Utah by Steve Bruno
Along the river’s edge, Zion Narrows, Zion National Park, Utah by Steve Bruno

In Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado in early summer, as the snow was still melting, I came across this snowbridge, which dissected this image in two:

Snowbridge in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado as sunrise lights up distant peaks by Steve Bruno
Snowbridge in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado as sunrise lights up distant peaks by Steve Bruno

In Bryce Canyon, Utah I shot this approaching thunderstorm over the horizon:

Summer thunderstorm moving in on Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah by Steve Bruno
Summer thunderstorm moving in on Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah by Steve Bruno

Also in Utah, I found this cactus in bloom in the desert south of Moab.  The mountains beyond are over 12,000 feet in elevation, their tops are above treeline.  So, half desert/half alpine terrain:

desert in bloom below the LaSal Mtns, near Moab, Utah by Steve Bruno
desert in bloom below the LaSal Mtns, near Moab, Utah by Steve Bruno

In a similar fashion, but further north, near Yellowstone National Park’s northeast entrance, the snow level made this a half-and-half:

late-spring snowfall on the mountains of southern Montana by Steve Bruno
late-spring snowfall on the mountains of southern Montana by Steve Bruno

A little closer to home, I shot this one in the Grand Canyon showing close detail as well as distant features:

detail of rimrock at Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona by Steve Bruno
detail of rimrock at Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona by Steve Bruno

Very close to home was this one from earlier in the month on the 4th of July.  Half fireworks/half Stratosphere:

4th of July Fireworks, Las Vegas, Nevada by Steve Bruno
4th of July Fireworks, Las Vegas, Nevada by Steve Bruno

a favorite place of mine that I haven’t been to for a while is Great Sand Dunes National Park in Colorado.  I shot this one on the edge of a dune crest there:

on the edge of a dune at Great Sand Dunes National Park by Steve Bruno
on the edge of a dune at Great Sand Dunes National Park by Steve Bruno

Another old favorite place, the Superstition Mountains of Arizona, yielded this image, “Halfway to the stars”:

the pinnacles of Peralta Canyon, Superstition Wilderness, Arizona as the sun rises by Steve Bruno
the pinnacles of Peralta Canyon, Superstition Wilderness, Arizona as the sun rises by Steve Bruno

Nearby, on the streets of Phoenix, we have half motion/half still buildings.  I almost thought about posting this one for the ROY B GIV challenge:

nighttime movement on the streets of Phoenix, Arizona by Steve Bruno
nighttime movement on the streets of Phoenix, Arizona by Steve Bruno

The featured image on this post was taken near Parker, Arizona.  The dried out desert looked across the river to the mountains in California, where the rain had started to fall.  Here is the uncropped version:

The desert near Parker, Arizona, as it looks across to California by Steve Bruno
The desert near Parker, Arizona, as it looks across to California by Steve Bruno

Also near Parker, Arizona, this one is half spring flowers/half reason why there were spring flowers:

Spring flowers in the desert near Parker, Arizona as another storm approaches by Steve Bruno
Spring flowers in the desert near Parker, Arizona as another storm approaches by Steve Bruno

And finally, Ben Huberman started us out with a half-and-half from Devil’s Tower.  Here is my take on that location:

Devil's Tower rises out of surrounding meadows by Steve Bruno
Devil’s Tower rises out of surrounding meadows by Steve Bruno

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Half and Half.”

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Three

In response to Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge-Three or the number 3

I have a trio of images for this challenge.  The featured photo is called the Three Sisters, which are three detached pinnacles at the end of a mesa in Monument Valley, Arizona.

The next shot is of three elk resting in a meadow near the Lumpy Ridge Trailhead in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado.  I did manipulate this one a bit in Photoshop to emphasize the elk.

Three Elk-Rocky Mountain Park-Steve Bruno

For the third image, I take you to sunset on the Atlantic Ocean at Fort Lauderdale, Florida.  This would be called “Three Palms”.

Three Palms-Fort Lauderdale-Steve Bruno

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