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Liquid

At the beginning of this month, we had our last winter storm.  After it cleared out, I went to nearby Red Rock Canyon to catch the rainwater pools before they evaporated, and I posted the first of those shots already.  After that first location, I hiked a little further to another great pool location.  Although now starting to clear out completely, the remaining clouds were just right for the occasion.

Red Rock Canyon, Nevada, rainwater pool, desert, Steve Bruno, landscape photography

rainwater pool, desert, Nevada, Red Rock Canyon, landscape photography

As I took the drive out, the creek crossings had running water, and i knew i had to return the next day to see the waterfalls.  I had aspirations to get to another location, but it’s been years since I’ve seen this one running.  By the time I finished taking photos and videos, it was too late to make it to my originally intended destination.  The water was no longer visible on the drive, and the volume flowing in the falls would probably be gone by the next day.

waterfall, desert, Red Rock Canyon, Nevada

For this week’s Daily Post Challenge:  Liquid

Monochrome Madness: MM 209

No matter what the temperature, I will rarely head out to take photographs if there are cloudless skies.  Sometimes clouds just add an element to the skies that reduce the sterility of the scene.  They always reflect light, and usually soften the light to some degree.  When the clouds are thick enough, they can provide a natural light painting to a landscape that cannot be duplicated in post-processing.  In the photograph above, a little bit of direct sunlight was hitting the cliffs in the middle-ground, while some filtered light was reaching a little further back to highlight the ridgelines.  Heavy clouds were lingering beyond, making for a dark mood in the back of the canyon.  I also had a brief cloud darken the foreground, helping to bring the attention to the cliffs.  I never would have pressed the shutter had this been a sunny day.

This is my contribution to Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness this week.  To see what other photographers have contributed, or instructions to join in, please visit Leanne’s website.

Earth Day 2018

I remember the first Earth Day in 1970.  At our school, each of the students was given a small tree to plant.  We planted ours in the front yard, and it remained a small tree for what seemed an eternity.  Although I have not lived in that house for many years now, I can go on Google Earth for a peek and see how much it has grown.  Although that is just one simple act, I cannot get a visual progress reminder how my daily efforts to be as green as possible are working.

When I planted that tree, I was still young, and didn’t realize that an environmental movement was needed.  I do remember public service ads against littering, and that it wasn’t uncommon to see a bag or a can flying out of the window of the car in front while driving down the highway.  I don’t think I began to comprehend the magnitude of mankind’s waste until the first time I heard the expression acid rain.  As our numbers grow, it becomes increasingly difficult to maintain a healthy planet, especially with consumer products becoming cheaper, and in the minds of many, more disposable.

Somewhere near the top of our environmental problems list would have to be our use of plastics.  Once they find their way to major rivers and oceans, they mostly end up in one of 5 garbage patches currently circulating our planet’s oceans.  Fortunately, there is an effort underway called The Ocean Cleanup, whose goal is to eliminate these vast floating debris piles.  You can go to their website to read more about it, or possibly donate to their cause.  This is, of course, just a large band-aid to a large problem.  The real solution is to curb our use of plastics and make sure they end up being recycled.

Pacific Ocean, sunset, CaliforniaHere in the US, one of the more prominent issues in recent times was the reduction of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument.  If ever there was a case to show that politicians work for special interests, and not the people, this would be it.  In the public input phase of this reduction, 99% of the respondents favored keeping the monument as it was.  In the redistricting map of the GSENM, they have created three separate national monuments.  Inside the former GSENM lies the highest concentration of well-preserved fossils ever discovered.  It also contains the richest and most accessible coal deposit in the state of Utah, which is no longer under protected status on the new map.  Coal consumption is on the decline in this country, so any coal mined here would most likely be sold to China.

Several lawsuits were filed to block the reduction of the national monuments, and Utah politicians immediately introduced a bill to manage the new property and see to it no further changes could ever be made.  Proposed management of the new national monuments would consist of a seven member panel, of which, a majority would be local county officials.  One of the members would also be appointed by the President, so a real public voice would be lost there as well.  These are still federal lands, not designated as Utah state parks.  Yes, our public lands in the hands of local politicians.  This is a precedence we cannot establish.  You can blame Trump all you want, but this ordeal was promoted and encouraged by Utah politicians.  We can all follow suit from the Outdoor Retailers Association, and some of its vendors, who have boycotted the state of Utah for its policies about the environment and how it should be overseen.  Although unlikely, a boycott by all potential visitors would send a message to the cronies in Salt Lake City that people coming to see the special lands in the southern part of the state provide a viable and profitable tourism economy.  Once this land is tarnished it will remain that way.

On a more positive note, a project I wrote about previously has been killed off.  The Grand Canyon Escalade, was voted down by Navajo Nation Council late last year.  Efforts by the tribe are underway to designate this area as a sacred site, and prevent any future blemishes on this special region from rearing their ugly heads again.  Perhaps a long legacy of Native Americans being offered roses, only to discover that they were just getting the fertilizer, has provided Navajos and other tribes a better insight to what is truly best for them and their land.  A special thank you goes out to the Navajo Nation Council and their wisdom for a long-term vision.

confluence, Grand Canyon, Arizona, Little Colorado River

Monochrome Madness: MM 204

I find cacti to be amazing plants in their ability to grow in the harsh conditions of the deserts of the world.  The defense system of these cacti, their needles, come in a variety of lengths and clusters.  Although it’s often just a painful nuisance for man, the needles are designed to keep out birds and animals that would take interest in one of these plants.  Generally speaking, large cacti have large needles and smaller cacti have smaller needles.  I have seen smaller cacti with large needles, but never large cacti with small needles.  Most often, they are spread across in a bit of a random pattern, but occasionally can be symmetrical as though computer designed.  If a cactus looks as though it might be soft and fuzzy, it’s probably the worst kind to get near.  Take for example, the one below whose pads look like potato chips.  It’s called a Funny Bunny, and might rank as one of the worst names ever for a plant.  One graze against this plant will leave dozens, or possibly hundreds of microscopic needles in your skin.  I know of one person who transported one on a breezy day and ended up in the hospital that evening having needles removed from his eyes.  Nothing funny about this one.

The top photo is my contribution to Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness this week.  To see what other photographers have contributed, or instructions to join in, please visit Leanne’s website.

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Awakening

About a week ago, I was hiking in nearby Red Rock Canyon.  The hike itself was more like scrambling amongst the sandstone outcrops, and it wasn’t until we started driving that we noticed a few bushes that seemed to have spider webs.  Finally coming closer to one, it was clear they were cocoons.  The plants that did have them, did not contain singular cocoons, but held clusters.  I finally had to pull over to investigate, and grabbed my iPhone for some videos.  It was rather breezy and I knew that would wreak havoc for focus on my DSLR videos.  At first, I thought it might be too early to see anything of interest happening inside the cocoons, but then there were subtle signs of life.  As I approached this cocoon, I noticed there were two escapees, as well as the cluster with activity.

For this week’s Daily Post Challenge: Awakening

Monochrome Madness: MM 203

Antelope Canyon is one of the most photographed spots in the southwestern US.  As you wander through this tight canyon, you can’t help but eventually look towards the sky which is no longer visible.  Light tries to find its way to the bottom, and as it does, highlights the textures of the smooth, twisted, sculpted walls.

This is my contribution to Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness this week.  Being the first one of the month, there was a theme of From Under.  To see what other photographers have contributed, or instructions to join in, please visit Leanne’s website.

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Sunset To Sunrise

Just because the sun has gone down for the night doesn’t mean it’s time to put away the camera.  For some of us, it’s the opposite.  This is when the best photos can happen, starting with the blue hour (above).  Once the blue hour has passed, you might be lucky enough to catch some stars.

Hawaii, stars, Mauna Kea, Steve Bruno

While some don’t venture into the great outdoors after dark, city streets can always provide subjects for your camera.  Perhaps you will even encounter some ghosts.

Seattle, ghosts, pedestrians

It wouldn’t be much fun watching fireworks in daylight, whether manmade or natural.

fireworks, Las Vegas, Steve Bruno

lightning, desert, Arizona

If you ever have a chance to witness lava flows up close, you will want to do this after sunset.  It’s quite difficult to see the lava underneath the surface, and you might be on top of it before you realize where it’s at.

Hawaii, sunset, lava, Steve Bruno

For Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Sunset To Sunrise

WPC: Story

“Get along little doggie!”

Or in this case, coyote.  At least that’s my best guess after an online search.  My first impression was bobcat tracks, but those turned out to be much different in shape.  This photo alone might be enough for a story, but yesterday turned out to be too good of a day to stop there.

SUNDAY’S HIKE

The initial weather forecast called for the storm to be out of here before noon on Sunday.  I set my alarm, but then rechecked the forecast one more time.  The official weather station on Mount Charleston was at 37 degrees, and the satellite image gave me the impression the event was moving out quicker.  With that in mind, I changed the alarm to an earlier time, thinking the sunrise might be spectacular.  Upon shutting the alarm off and falling back to sleep, I awoke closer to my original plan, and decided there might still be some something worthwhile to photograph.  This just meant I would be joining all the weekend warriors.

As we headed up the mountain, we began to drive through a low cloud cover.  Even the tailgaters eased off as visibility became very limited.  Just before approaching the ski area, we emerged with a clear view.  I pulled off to the side of the road, as the freshly coated Mummy Mountain had great light hitting it.  In the time it took for me to cross the road and open up my tripod, the light was gone.  The fog we had driven through was racing up the mountainside.  Little did I know at the time that this was the last bit of blue sky I would see for the day.  That’s Mummy Mountain’s outline in the upper left corner.

Mummy Mountain, Lee Canyon, Spring Mountains, Nevada

Although I was a little disappointed, this was the view everyone else was getting, and I came out to hike a trail I’ve been on several times before – one that would take me up into the snow and the bristlecone pines.  When I reached the parking area, there was a vehicle with three young men already returning.  I was still reasonably early, and it wasn’t long before their tracks were no longer visible, and my feet were laying down the only marks in the snow.  This desert dweller hasn’t been in the altitude much lately, and my stops were numerous.  Taking photos was a good excuse to lengthen my stops, because I know I can’t take a steady picture without a tripod when I’m breathing that hard.  Especially detail shots with a telephoto lens.

fresh snow, forest, gottatakemorepix

fresh snow, fog, mountains, Nevada, gottatakemorepix

The fog was varying in its density, and with each thinning stage, I thought that was going to be it.  The trail started around 8300 feet, and I knew I was up over 9000 feet.  The temps were too warm for the snow, and I could see clumps falling off branches all around me.  That’s when I came across the tracks.  Fortunately my lingering photographer’s pace was allowing other hikers to catch up to me on the trail, many with big dogs, and I knew my chances of becoming breakfast were diminishing.  In this area were many trees with intriguing shapes, standing eerily in the fog.  I took numerous shots in this area, then continued.  In a short time I arrived at the largest bristlecone pine on the trail, perhaps the largest I have ever seen.  Around this time the sun became visible, although the fog was still there.  I don’t think I have ever seen this tree under more perfect conditions.

giant tree, fog, bristlecone pine, Spring Mountains, Las Vegas, Steve Bruno photography

I continued along to an area I have stopped before. The fog gave this group a different light than any previous visit.

forest, Mount Charleston, Nevada, Steve Bruno

I tried continuing further, but this part of the trail, now around 9500 feet, had a little deeper snowfall.  And a steeper pitch with a slight sideways pitch.  That was becoming too much work without spikes under my shoes, so I headed back.  This turned out to be excellent timing, as the fog was making a comeback.  The trail was getting slippery and/or muddy in spots, I was starting to feel the fatigue of mountain air.  I could barely see the forest in the canyon right in front of me.

dense fog, trees

I made one final stop, and as I did the fog was now leaving many microdrops on my camera, though not my lens.  Those made for some excellent b&w images which I will post soon.  It was close to 2:00 when I finished, and the conditions were not what I was anticipating, but certainly made for an awesome day.

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Leaves or Trees

For a nature photographer, trees and their leaves have to be a top subject matter.  The photo above was from the forest floor near Hilo, Hawaii.  Also from the big island, about 50 miles away was this strange looking one.  A pregnant tree?  Hmmm.

tree, rain forest, Hawaii, gottatakemorepix

In the same forest was this one which I call “reaching out”.

rain forest, Hawaii, branches, Steve Bruno photography

I think the trees most associated with Hawaii would have to be palm trees.

lone palm tree, Hawaii, Steve Bruno

Much closer to home, on the slopes of Mount Charleston are my favorite trees to photograph – the bristlecone pines.

bristlecone pine, Mount Charleston, Nevada, gottatakemorepix

I have fond memories of running through the yard kicking up fallen leaves while growing up.  That might be a little tough to do with all these boulders, but the forest floor in Oak Creek Canyon, Arizona is beautiful in autumn.

autumn, fallen leaves, Oak Creek Canyon, Sedona, Arizona, Steve Bruno photography

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