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Season’s Greetings

With ridiculously warm temperatures and fires throughout the west, I’ve had little incentive to want to be out photographing this year. A couple hundred people got to live out my worst nightmare earlier this year when fast moving fires in California required them to be rescued in the forest. Las Vegas finally ended a string of 240 days without measurable rain last week. That should be a forever-standing record, and if it ends up being broken, we’re in deep trouble.

Despite so much negative news taking place, there have been some wonderful rare events this year. The Comet Neowise and this week’s Jupiter-Saturn conjunction have been a part of that. I bought a long telephoto lens a couple of years ago with the hopes of using it for wildlife and moonrise photos. I did research on telescopes vs. telephoto lenses before my purchase, and realized a telescope would have too many limitations. My lens has had a learning curve, and I have been pleasantly surprised to find that I can see Saturn’s rings in a photo taken with this lens. All this from the comfort of my backyard. I guess the lesson we should be taking from 2020 is that good things are still happening and we just need to keep our eyes and our minds open to them.

Midweek Monochrome 07-22-20

The Comet Neowise has been making its way through the nighttime skies recently, and last week I made several short trips away from city lights to view this rare sight. On my first night out, I didn’t know what to expect, so I only packed a couple fast lenses. I achieved some nice results, and went out the next night trying to get this shot with a very long and very slow lens. That was a disaster, and just reaffirmed that it’s not a nighttime lens. I went back the following night to the same spot with a much faster medium telephoto lens. I made the switch to a mirrorless camera not very long ago, and this was my first attempt at nighttime photography since. I didn’t find it easy to frame the image using the mirrorless, so I ended up taking handheld shots with my old camera and 50mm f/1.2 lens as a spotting device to find the part of the ridge I wanted as a foreground. Then I set the tripod in place for the telephoto shots.

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Sunset To Sunrise

Just because the sun has gone down for the night doesn’t mean it’s time to put away the camera.  For some of us, it’s the opposite.  This is when the best photos can happen, starting with the blue hour (above).  Once the blue hour has passed, you might be lucky enough to catch some stars.

Hawaii, stars, Mauna Kea, Steve Bruno

While some don’t venture into the great outdoors after dark, city streets can always provide subjects for your camera.  Perhaps you will even encounter some ghosts.

Seattle, ghosts, pedestrians

It wouldn’t be much fun watching fireworks in daylight, whether manmade or natural.

fireworks, Las Vegas, Steve Bruno

lightning, desert, Arizona

If you ever have a chance to witness lava flows up close, you will want to do this after sunset.  It’s quite difficult to see the lava underneath the surface, and you might be on top of it before you realize where it’s at.

Hawaii, sunset, lava, Steve Bruno

For Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Sunset To Sunrise

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