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Steve Bruno Photo

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Leaves or Trees

For a nature photographer, trees and their leaves have to be a top subject matter.  The photo above was from the forest floor near Hilo, Hawaii.  Also from the big island, about 50 miles away was this strange looking one.  A pregnant tree?  Hmmm.

tree, rain forest, Hawaii, gottatakemorepix

In the same forest was this one which I call “reaching out”.

rain forest, Hawaii, branches, Steve Bruno photography

I think the trees most associated with Hawaii would have to be palm trees.

lone palm tree, Hawaii, Steve Bruno

Much closer to home, on the slopes of Mount Charleston are my favorite trees to photograph – the bristlecone pines.

bristlecone pine, Mount Charleston, Nevada, gottatakemorepix

I have fond memories of running through the yard kicking up fallen leaves while growing up.  That might be a little tough to do with all these boulders, but the forest floor in Oak Creek Canyon, Arizona is beautiful in autumn.

autumn, fallen leaves, Oak Creek Canyon, Sedona, Arizona, Steve Bruno photography

Monochrome Madness: MM 198

Life in the desert moves at a slow pace.  Without much water, growth is slow, and subsequently, so is death.  This dying cholla cactus appears to have marked its own grave, but will eventually succumb to the elements and gravity.  The younger, healthier ones (right portion of frame) are bright yellow or green and are easy to notice and avoid.  During their life, they eventually drop several sections.  In the course of time those begin to camouflage themselves, browning to match the stones beneath, and still just as painful.  Walking through a dense cholla forest is like navigating a minefield.  If you manage to get too close to one, you will swear you have been bitten by something.

For Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness: MM 198

WPC: Out Of This World

I think flying over the desert provides the best out of this world perspectives, and I wrote about that previously.  For this week’s challenge, I couldn’t help but think of my muse, Valley Of Fire State Park.  I love to explore here for all its intricate, often other-worldy details.

The wall of caves (above) would be mildly interesting, but then there’s all those smaller holes worn in behind them.  Then you have the layers of sandstone with all those colors bleeding through, all combining to make this a very strange place.  I call this one “psychedelic sandstone”.

Valley Of Fire, Nevada, cave, red rock

In some of the caves you can crawl inside, where textures and patterns all come to life when the sunlight comes bouncing in.

Valley Of Fire, Nevada, red rock, sandstone, gottatakemorepix

One of the most unique features I’ve ever seen here is this rib of sandstone, appearing as a leg with a pointed shoe.  For obvious reasons, I call this one “walking sandstone”.

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Birds

Although I spend a fair amount of time photographing nature, it’s not very often I encounter wildlife, especially birds that are close enough to photograph.

While in Calgary, Canada, I encountered many geese with their young goslings in late spring along the Bow River (above).

Last summer, I ventured into the forests of Oregon.  I think I got a little too close to the nest of this guy, as he became quite vocal.

bird, tree, Oregon, Steve Bruno

During one of my trips to Seattle, I met this beggar.

bird, gull, Seattle, Pacific Ocean, Steve Bruno

No tree is an island, but this one came close, and provided a nice resting spot for these white birds near Hilo, Hawaii.

birds, Hawaii, gottatakemorepix

While in Texas last spring, I was able to witness this beautiful heron at the end of the day.

heron, Texas, gottatakemorepix

In the unlikeliest of places, on several visits, I have seen ducks in this side canyon of a major hiking trail in Red Rock Canyon, Nevada.  The water stays year round, but the largest pool is not that big, and the canyon walls are not tall enough to provide constant shade in the 100 degree temps of summer.

ducks, Red Rock Canyon, Nevada, Steve Bruno

Monochrome Madness: MM 197

Water is the planet’s most precious resource, especially here in the desert.  Last month we finally had a day of rain that put an end to a string of 116 days without measurable rain at the official weather gauge in Las Vegas.  The previous rainfall was a trace…..enough to wet the pavement, but not enough for the insects or birds to get a drink.  Go back another five days to when there were numbers on the rain gauge.  That’s 121 days.  One third of a year.  At a time of year that is supposed to be the wettest.  Similar stats have taken place throughout the southwest.

As each month draws to a close, it seems the news people tell us how it was the hottest (January, February, March, etc.) on record, or at least a top five.  In 2017, the temperature never dropped below freezing, which has never happened here before.  The doubters of global warming will tell you it’s because we are adding more concrete, thus raising temperatures where the official readings are taken.  I assure you, no one is building near our airport.  Even more remote places are showing elevated average readings.

The photo above is from a previous winter, and is from a lesser-known part of Red Rock Canyon, west of Las Vegas.  It’s probably a good thing that there is not a marked trail to get here.  This is my contribution to Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness this week.  To see what other photographers have contributed, or instructions to join in, please visit Leanne’s website.

WPC: Variations On A Theme

Incorporating the sun into a landscape photo can present many undesirable effects, unless you have the right conditions.  It usually comes down to having the right clouds.  If that isn’t happening, you can use a foreground element to partially block the sun.  In the case of the photo above, there was a heavy overcast sky which just allowed enough of the sun to come through over Valley Of Fire State Park, Nevada.  This is my submission to Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness this week.  This is also my post for this week’s Daily Post Challenge: Variations on a theme.

Another shot from Valley Of Fire that includes the sun was this one through an arch.  There was another small opening in the rock, and I positioned myself to a spot where the sun was just catching the edge of the rock.  This was a matter of inches in either direction for getting the sunburst I wanted, or getting full blown sun flare.

sun, sunburst, desert, red rocks, valley of fire, nevada, steve bruno

With decent optics, and just a little bit of time in editing, there are times you don’t need anything to filter the sun out at all.

 

Morning Sun Black Sand Beach Hawaii

Sometimes, I’ve gotten lucky, and the perfect cloud has moved into place.  This photo from the Grand Canyon was one of those moments.  The cloud was just large enough to block the sun for about 10 seconds – all I needed.

sunset, grand canyon, national parks, arizona, gottatakemorepix, steve bruno

Of course, there was nothing like the film days, and being able to stop down to f/64 or f/90 with a large format lens.  I think there might have been a little humidity in the air to help this one, too.

sunrise, ozarks, missouri, gottatakemorepix

Monochrome Madness: MM 192

Most visitors to the North Rim of the Grand Canyon see the forests of the Kaibab Plateau upon entering and exiting the park.  The plateau drops off sharply on either side, and much of the land north of the Grand Canyon is vast, wide open desert.  On one of my trips to the west side of the plateau, I set out across the desert, mostly following one wash.  Above one side of the wash, I found this lonely boulder with an opening beneath it, and the late afternoon sun perfectly highlighting the grasses and other textures beneath it.

This is my contribution to Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness this week.  To see what other photographers have contributed, or instructions to join in, please visit Leanne’s website.

WPC: Favorites

Back when I shot with a large-format view camera, I would certainly agree with Mr. Adams.  Now that I use a camera that can shoot hundreds of frames in a day, oddly enough, I still agree.

I spent time in Hawaii this summer, and I’m sure I have twelve photographs that I like from just the first couple days.  When I look at all of the images I have captured this year, and try to envision those which I will still cherish years from now, the process of choosing twelve became clearer.  My time in nature was limited this year, but I made those moments count.  In some situations I had similar lighting or compositions where I couldn’t really define one shot as a clear favorite, but in the end, I think I’m very happy with these 12.

I don’t own a drone, but I love taking photos from airplanes.  This photo from over White Sands, New Mexico looks amazing at full size, with all the dunes at the edge looking like bubbling foam.

aerial photography, desert, dunes, White Sands, New Mexico, Steve Bruno

My ‘backyard’ locations of Red Rock Canyon or Valley Of Fire didn’t see me as much as in years past, yet I had plenty of images which made the A list.

sunrise, Red Rock Canyon, Las Vegas, Nevada, gottatakemorepix

rainwater pools, Red Rock Canyon, Las Vegas, Nevada, Steve Bruno

reflection, Red Rock Canyon, Las Vegas, Nevada, Steve Bruno

natural windows, sandstone, Valley Of Fire, Nevada, Steve Bruno

natural arch, desert, Valley Of Fire, Nevada, gottatakemorepix

A little further out, but still in Nevada, I captured many satisfactory images in a short time at Cathedral Gorge.  I had no trouble picking a favorite, however.

sunset, desert, Cathedral Gorge, Nevada, gottatakemorepix

Oregon was another place I spent some time last summer.  Although the trip was mainly for a family gathering, I had time afterwards to head to the trails in the Columbia River Gorge.

waterfalls, Oregon, Columbia River Gorge, Steve Bruno

As I mentioned earlier, Hawaii was part of my travels this year, and gave me many great photo opportunities.  My time on the lava fields at sunset certainly stands out as one of my favorite experiences, not just for this year, but for a lifetime.

 

Pacific Ocean, cliffs, Hawaiiold growth forest, Hawaii, trees, gottatakemorepixwaves, lava, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean, Steve Brunolava flow, Hawaii, sunset, gottatakemorepix

 

Monochrome Madness: MM4-32

As we approach winter in the northern hemisphere, scenes like this should be common.  Instead, the nightly news talks about fires in California, and how the firefighters will be on the job until Christmas, and now perhaps until New Year’s Day.  Here’s hoping for rain and snow soon for our neighbors in California.

This image is from the Mammoth region of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and is my contribution to Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness this week.  To see what other photographers have contributed, or instructions to join in, please visit Leanne’s website.

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